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So this weekend I built myself a nice simple 14th century tunic based on the Herjolfsnes 43 pattern. I made it out of the same light green linen that I used for Adela’s kirtle (though I may chuck it in a dark blue dye bath). I hate finishing seams after they’re sewn and setting gores and gussets in by machine, so I did it all by hand. I needed frequent breaks to wake my sewing hand back up, but all in all it went pretty smoothly. Next up, some wool chausses!




peteyfrogboy: (Default)

So this weekend I built myself a nice simple 14th century tunic based on the Herjolfsnes 43 pattern. I made it out of the same light green linen that I used for Adela’s kirtle (though I may chuck it in a dark blue dye bath). I hate finishing seams after they’re sewn and setting gores and gussets in by machine, so I did it all by hand. I needed frequent breaks to wake my sewing hand back up, but all in all it went pretty smoothly. Next up, some wool chausses!

Mirrored from Lorenzo's Workshop.

Toga! Toga!

May. 9th, 2011 10:39 am
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I went up to visit Philippa on Saturday and help her with various bits of her Eleanora de Toledo dress. She also helped me put together a toga for this weekend’s Roman-themed May Tourney. I had bought 20 yards of $1/yd 45″ wide unbleached muslin, thinking that would be way more than I needed. It turned out that the toga took up three 5 yd. lengths of fabric, and the ankle-length tunica took up all but a single yard of the rest. Yay for overbuying! It’s pretty comfy and looks cool; we’ll see how it fares on Saturday.




Toga! Toga!

May. 9th, 2011 10:39 am
peteyfrogboy: (Default)

I went up to visit Philippa on Saturday and help her with various bits of her Eleanora de Toledo dress. She also helped me put together a toga for this weekend’s Roman-themed May Tourney. I had bought 20 yards of $1/yd 45″ wide unbleached muslin, thinking that would be way more than I needed. It turned out that the toga took up three 5 yd. lengths of fabric, and the ankle-length tunica took up all but a single yard of the rest. Yay for overbuying! It’s pretty comfy and looks cool; we’ll see how it fares on Saturday.

Mirrored from Lorenzo's Workshop.

peteyfrogboy: (Default)

I mourn for all the years I wasted not wearing wool hose. These were by far the best hose I’ve ever worn. They fit so well that I hardly ever thought about them, were only hot when I was sitting in the blazing sun, and looked great. Aside from the inevitable wrinkles at the ankles, there was no bagging or sagging anywhere, even after a long day of wear. I think I’ll cut the next pair a bit higher in the crotch, but that’s about all I can think of. I put a doubled linen facing at the waist (and accidentally in the crotch curve, but that’s another story), which made a nice sturdy place to put in the eyelets.

As for the brache, they seemed to perform well, aside from a couple of seams blowing out. I think they may be a touch small, so the next pair will get an extra couple inches in each leg. Otherwise, no complaints.

Dreamstone was a lovely event, composed primarily of hanging out with friends and occasionally dropping in for field-side classes. The weather was beautiful.

Mirrored from Lorenzo's Workshop.

peteyfrogboy: (Default)

This past weekend I showed Philippa how to do pewter casting, and she made a whole pile of bling for her Eleanora de Toledo gown. I’m looking forward to seeing how the rough castings turn out once they’re all assembled.


All of my old brache (linen drawers) have been wearing out, so I decided I needed to make some more. I’d been using a pattern with two tubular legs and a strip that went all the way through the middle from front to back. It works well enough, but tends to wear through at the top of the inner thigh. This time I switched to a square gusset in the crotch, and so far it seems comfortable enough, with less bulk at the waist. This weekend will be the test to see how it works in real life. I have high hopes.


I also finally started a pair of wool hose. I have some tropical weight worsted wool suiting that I bought at least a year ago from fabric.com. It’s very light and drapey, and I’ve been putting off using it for far too long. I cut out the legs (on the bias, of course) using my trusty old hose pattern, sewed up the back seam, and pinned them on to an old doublet. I am ashamed at how long it’s taken me to try this, as they look, feel, and fit wonderfully. We’ll see if that remains true once I get the feet and lacing holes in, but I suspect these will be my favorite hose. One step closer to a decent pair of full hose…




Originally published at Lorenzo's Workshop

peteyfrogboy: (Default)

This past weekend I showed Philippa how to do pewter casting, and she made a whole pile of bling for her Eleanora de Toledo gown. I’m looking forward to seeing how the rough castings turn out once they’re all assembled.

All of my old brache (linen drawers) have been wearing out, so I decided I needed to make some more. I’d been using a pattern with two tubular legs and a strip that went all the way through the middle from front to back. It works well enough, but tends to wear through at the top of the inner thigh. This time I switched to a square gusset in the crotch, and so far it seems comfortable enough, with less bulk at the waist. This weekend will be the test to see how it works in real life. I have high hopes.

I also finally started a pair of wool hose. I have some tropical weight worsted wool suiting that I bought at least a year ago from fabric.com. It’s very light and drapey, and I’ve been putting off using it for far too long. I cut out the legs (on the bias, of course) using my trusty old hose pattern, sewed up the back seam, and pinned them on to an old doublet. I am ashamed at how long it’s taken me to try this, as they look, feel, and fit wonderfully. We’ll see if that remains true once I get the feet and lacing holes in, but I suspect these will be my favorite hose. One step closer to a decent pair of full hose…

Mirrored from Lorenzo's Workshop.

peteyfrogboy: (Default)

This weekend was the first chance I was able to get together with both my new student Philippa and my apprentice Serafina. We met up at Philippa’s house to work on various projects.


A couple weeks ago I helped Philippa drape a body block for herself. We used that to work out patterns for a kirtle and loose gown modeled after a portrait of Eleanora de Toledo. After a few iterations of drafting and test fitting, we arrived at a pretty good shape.



Serafina brought along a new pouch that she’s been working on, and made good progress on it. It’s shaping up to be very close to the period examples she’s working from.



After we finished sewing for the day, we went over a few dances that Philippa wanted to teach her students later this week. Despite having to imagine most of the other dancers in our sets, I think it went pretty well.




peteyfrogboy: (Default)

This weekend was the first chance I was able to get together with both my new student Philippa and my apprentice Serafina. We met up at Philippa’s house to work on various projects.

A couple weeks ago I helped Philippa drape a body block for herself. We used that to work out patterns for a kirtle and loose gown modeled after a portrait of Eleanora de Toledo. After a few iterations of drafting and test fitting, we arrived at a pretty good shape.

Serafina brought along a new pouch that she’s been working on, and made good progress on it. It’s shaping up to be very close to the period examples she’s working from.

After we finished sewing for the day, we went over a few dances that Philippa wanted to teach her students later this week. Despite having to imagine most of the other dancers in our sets, I think it went pretty well.

Mirrored from Lorenzo's Workshop.

peteyfrogboy: (Default)

After adjusting the armscye, I attached the neckline facing:



I basted the facing in at the top and bottom (with the edge turned under), then used the bottom row of basting stitches as a guide to topstitch the facing from the front. I used a back stitch with  two strands of cotton embroidery floss.


Next, I used the machine to attach the binding from the front and then hand sewed it down on the inside. After a pile of eyelets, the bodice was finished:




Here you can see the shoulder seams:








The neckline sits a little funny, especially in this spot, though it’s hard to see in this picture. I’m not going to mess with it until I get the sleeves and skirt on, and see if it works itself out.




peteyfrogboy: (Default)

After adjusting the armscye, I attached the neckline facing:

I basted the facing in at the top and bottom (with the edge turned under), then used the bottom row of basting stitches as a guide to topstitch the facing from the front. I used a back stitch with  two strands of cotton embroidery floss.

Next, I used the machine to attach the binding from the front and then hand sewed it down on the inside. After a pile of eyelets, the bodice was finished:


Here you can see the shoulder seams:



The neckline sits a little funny, especially in this spot, though it’s hard to see in this picture. I’m not going to mess with it until I get the sleeves and skirt on, and see if it works itself out.

Mirrored from Lorenzo's Workshop.

peteyfrogboy: (Default)

Ah, I’ve forgotten how nice an all-night sewing binge can be! I was up until 1 AM, but I got the bodice mostly put together. I decided to use the construction technique that can be seen in van der Weyden’s St. John altarpiece, with the back and shoulder seams finished on the inside. This should allow for easier alteration in the future. The layers used in the bodice are a light green linen (which might be cotton/linen), an interlining of the medium weight blue cotton/linen I’ve been using for ages now, and a lining of lightweight white linen.


First phase of construction


One of my goals with this dress is to re-integrate some machine sewing into my technique. I used the machine to sew up the side seams, and to zig-zag on a couple extra layers of the interlining at the center front edge to reinforce the eyelets. The lining and interlining are cut to the same shape, while the green linen was cut a little larger at the seams and the armscye and waist edges. You can see here where the green linen has been turned under and sewn down at the armscye and waist. The remaining edges are hand-basted to keep them together.


Front shoulder seam complete


Here the first shoulder seam has been finished. The main seam was sewn by machine, and then the edges were sewn down by hand, with the green linen turned over the edge of the linings.


Both shoulder seams sewn (and altered)


Here both shoulder seams are complete, and you can see part of the neckline facing basted in place. I did a test fit of the bodice after finishing the main seams, and found that the armscye was too big at the front. I marked where the seam needed to be adjusted, and altered the seam without any fuss. The construction technique seems to live up to its potential.


There really wasn’t a whole lot of machine sewing that I was able to do using this method. I ended up having to reinforce a couple of the seams by hand, as they were already starting to come apart while I was finishing them. I think I’ll still use the machine on the skirt seams, but I don’t know if I trust it for bodice seams that will be under real stress.




peteyfrogboy: (Default)

Ah, I’ve forgotten how nice an all-night sewing binge can be! I was up until 1 AM, but I got the bodice mostly put together. I decided to use the construction technique that can be seen in van der Weyden’s St. John altarpiece, with the back and shoulder seams finished on the inside. This should allow for easier alteration in the future. The layers used in the bodice are a light green linen (which might be cotton/linen), an interlining of the medium weight blue cotton/linen I’ve been using for ages now, and a lining of lightweight white linen.

First phase of construction

One of my goals with this dress is to re-integrate some machine sewing into my technique. I used the machine to sew up the side seams, and to zig-zag on a couple extra layers of the interlining at the center front edge to reinforce the eyelets. The lining and interlining are cut to the same shape, while the green linen was cut a little larger at the seams and the armscye and waist edges. You can see here where the green linen has been turned under and sewn down at the armscye and waist. The remaining edges are hand-basted to keep them together.

Front shoulder seam complete

Here the first shoulder seam has been finished. The main seam was sewn by machine, and then the edges were sewn down by hand, with the green linen turned over the edge of the linings.

Both shoulder seams sewn (and altered)

Here both shoulder seams are complete, and you can see part of the neckline facing basted in place. I did a test fit of the bodice after finishing the main seams, and found that the armscye was too big at the front. I marked where the seam needed to be adjusted, and altered the seam without any fuss. The construction technique seems to live up to its potential.

There really wasn’t a whole lot of machine sewing that I was able to do using this method. I ended up having to reinforce a couple of the seams by hand, as they were already starting to come apart while I was finishing them. I think I’ll still use the machine on the skirt seams, but I don’t know if I trust it for bodice seams that will be under real stress.

Mirrored from Lorenzo's Workshop.

peteyfrogboy: (Default)

I’ve finally started on Adela’s new clothes: a 15th century Flemish kirtle and gown suitable for fancy occasions. The kirtle is based on the ones shown in various paintings by Rogier van der Weyden, like this one:



It has short sleeves, with distinctive seam lines at the front and back of the shoulder. Some examples have another seam at the top of the shoulder as well. While in some cases it looks like it might be a raglan sleeve, you can see here a short set-in sleeve. There is also a seam line parallel to the neckline, as well as what looks like a binding at the neckline edge itself. I’ve got some theories about this that I’ll be putting into practice as this progresses.


ETA:


Here’s the pattern:



When I worked the pattern out, I put the shoulder seam in. I’m not sure if it will make any difference; I may go ahead and edit it out when I make the real thing.




peteyfrogboy: (Default)

I’ve finally started on Adela’s new clothes: a 15th century Flemish kirtle and gown suitable for fancy occasions. The kirtle is based on the ones shown in various paintings by Rogier van der Weyden, like this one:

It has short sleeves, with distinctive seam lines at the front and back of the shoulder. Some examples have another seam at the top of the shoulder as well. While in some cases it looks like it might be a raglan sleeve, you can see here a short set-in sleeve. There is also a seam line parallel to the neckline, as well as what looks like a binding at the neckline edge itself. I’ve got some theories about this that I’ll be putting into practice as this progresses.

ETA:

Here’s the pattern:

When I worked the pattern out, I put the shoulder seam in. I’m not sure if it will make any difference; I may go ahead and edit it out when I make the real thing.

Mirrored from Lorenzo's Workshop.

peteyfrogboy: (Default)
I had a very good weekend. Midwinter A&S went well as far as I know; I had a great time, but I'm easy to please. There were a lot of good and inspiring entries. I had a bit of a personal challenge trying to judge an 11th century Angle-Saxon tunic that I knew next to nothing about, but between my fellow judges and the documentation I hope I managed to put together some useful feedback.[livejournal.com profile] adelavanbrugge scored well with both of her C&I entries, and got some good comments. She's already plotting her next project, which should surprise no one.

This was also the field test of the Bronzino suit, which performed reasonably well. I cobbled together a pair of sewn-in netherstockings from an old pair of 15c linen hose. They worked fine standing up, but when I tried to sit down (a precarious adventure at the best of times in this kind of suit) half the stitches blew out on one side, as you can see here. I think that a new or refurbished pair of stockings will make this a good suit for being flashy in, but the old grey linen suit (which I switched into in the afternoon) is still my most comfortable.

Royal court was brief but filled with good things, not the least of which was Mistress Temair's well-deserved elevation to the Laurel. Baronial court was in the afternoon and was quite entertaining. I got to do several scrolls for this court, including the A&S tourney champion scroll, a pair of matching baronial Tower awards for Arnora and Cynwrig, and Cynwrig's Baronial Jeweler scroll. One piece of court business that I did not have prior knowledge of was [livejournal.com profile] serafinalamanni 's selection as baronial A&S champion, which was a happy surprise for all. Court was followed by an amazing feast cooked by our own George Ploppy, and a bit of dancing before people started packing up.

On Sunday I dusted off my armor and went to the amazingly well-attended baronial fighter practice. I think I managed not to embarrass myself too badly. I didn't sustain any serious injuries, but my entire body is stiff and sore today; my hands are so stiff it's difficult to type. It was a good time, though, and I wish there were a fighter practice that was within a reasonable distance from home. I may have to make some more inquiries in that direction...
peteyfrogboy: (Default)

I got the codpiece finished and installed today, which pretty much completes the suit. I need to make a proper point to hold up the codpiece, and maybe open up the sleeves at the wrists just a tad, but the actual construction is done. I'll get better pictures at some point with better light and accessories and all that, but I wanted to make up for the lack of pictures lately with a few right now. The panes of the trunk hose sit a little funny when viewed from certain angles and/or when I stand a certain way, but I don't know if there's really a fix for that. Certainly not one I feel like attempting right now.
peteyfrogboy: (Default)
I tried taking a picture of the trunk hose in their current state, but when I'm not wearing them all you an see is a pile of slashy silk. What I do have pictures of is the codpiece, or at least the foundation of it. I sewed up the center back seam of the trunk hose, leaving the bottom curve of the crotch and the entire center front open. The foundation of the codpiece is basiacally a large triangular gusset that is sewn into the bottom of the crotch seam, with a flap that covers the center front opening of the trunk hose. The top six inches or so of the center front is closed by five pairs of hooks and eyes.
The codpiece will be consist of (from outside to inside) a layer of silk (perhaps with an interlining of linen if it seems necessary) that will have the padded "display" portion of the codpiece, a layer of fulled wool pad stitched to a layer of linen, and the light blue satin for the inner lining.

The first picture shows the linen and wool stitched together.

The second shows the entire foundation basted together and tacked into place. I'm going to do some shaping at the front which is currently marked by pins. The outer layer will be made of three pieces: the triangular gusset and two halves of the padded portion.

The third picture shows the gusset portion tacked into the crotch seam from the inside. The two sides of the seam turned out to be not quite equal in total length, so one side had to be eased in some for everything to line up.
peteyfrogboy: (Default)
Still no pictures, I know (must find the camera), but progress has been made. Each leg of the trunk hose has had its edges bound, and now has seven pairs of eyelets, which should be sufficient (the rearmost pair on each leg will probably go unused). I also sewed up the center back seam. In short, all that's left is the hooks and eyes in the front and the codpiece, which I have yet to pattern.
peteyfrogboy: (Default)


It's been a while since I've posted anything here, but I have been making slow progress on the trunk hose. The left leg is mostly completed, and the right leg is ready to assemble. The first picture shows the left leg with the foundation and lining sewn together, and waist- and leg-bands installed. The lining is gathered at the top and bottom, but not padded. The next picture shows the panes for the left leg finished and laid out in order. Each pane went through the following process:
  1. Cut the taffeta, linen interlining, and satin lining.
  2. Mark the trapunto lines on the back of the taffeta.
  3. Slash the taffeta from the front side. The slashing pattern had to evolve somewhat as I went along.
  4. Put the taffeta and interlining together and work the trapunto.
  5. Turn under the top and bottom edges of the outer layer, then sew in the lining at the top and bottom.
  6. Bind the edges.
Then the panes were sewn on to the waist- and leg-band, gathering as necessary to fit. The panes along the inside of the leg were not gathered, to allow the panes to hang more or less vertically.

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