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The codpiece is made and installed. The main part of the codpiece is a single layer of wool with no interlining, stuffed with strips cut from a failed linen sleeve lining. The base is one layer of the heavy wool and a lining of white linen. The edge binding and racing stripe are velveteen.


Construction and Pictures )
Originally published at Lorenzo's Workshop

peteyfrogboy: (Default)

The codpiece is made and installed. The main part of the codpiece is a single layer of wool with no interlining, stuffed with strips cut from a failed linen sleeve lining. The base is one layer of the heavy wool and a lining of white linen. The edge binding and racing stripe are velveteen.

I sewed the center seam on the machine, then turned t and basted it to the wool base. I sewed around the base of the stuffed portion, leaving an open section on one side to put the stuffing in. Once it was stuffed, I closed up the hole and sewed the trim on. Next came the binding in the usual manner. I did it in two pieces only because that’s what was demanded by the length of scraps I had on hand. At this point I sewed five pairs of hooks and eyes (alternating) on the center front opening of the trunk hose. The point of the codpiece was sewn in at the bottom of the opening; each side was only sewn on for about 2″. Eyelets in the codpiece and trunk hose finished the process.

Mirrored from Lorenzo's Workshop.

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The trunk hose are nearly complete now. All that remains is binding one of the canions, adding hooks and eyes at the center front opening, and building the codpiece.



Lots of Pictures )
Originally published at Lorenzo's Workshop

peteyfrogboy: (Default)

The trunk hose are nearly complete now. All that remains is binding one of the canions, adding hooks and eyes at the center front opening, and building the codpiece.

Mirrored from Lorenzo's Workshop.

peteyfrogboy: (Default)

As promised, here’s the step-by-step for installing the pocket. To refresh your memory on what the pocket is supposed to look like, you can refer back to the portrait.


Lots of Pictures )
Originally published at Lorenzo's Workshop

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As promised, here’s the step-by-step for installing the pocket. To refresh your memory on what the pocket is supposed to look like, you can refer back to the portrait.

First we start off with the interlining for the “poof”. I cut it from the last of the wool that I’ve used for years and years for this sort of thing. It provides body and springiness and I’ll miss it terribly. There wasn’t enough of it left by this point to get the whole thing out of one piece. Instead of trying to piece in scraps of the same stuff (which would make really bulky seams) I finished the ends off with some cotton I’ve been using for patterning. Conveniently enough, this will help reduce bulk at the inner leg, which is always a good thing in these situations. The poof was patterned based on the trunk hose pattern, with the pieces spread apart. I eyeballed a lot of lengths and had to make a few changes along the way, but it seems to have turned out okay.

Mirrored from Lorenzo's Workshop.

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I added a page on drafting sleeves last week, just in case you actually read this blog instead of getting here from FB or LJ.

Mirrored from Lorenzo's Workshop.

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