Mar. 11th, 2013

peteyfrogboy: (rook)

Back when I was figuring out how to build locks before, I found this lovely resource that got me going in the right direction. This first version of the lock mechanism is based on what I recall doing last time, but I don’t think it’s the way I’ll be going in the end. Still, it was a good exercise.

So here we have the key I bought. In the past I cut the bit down on my keys, but this one is small enough that I plan to leave it intact. I hate to cut up old things if I don’t have to, so this makes me happy.

Here I have the back plate of the lock mechanism, with a hole drilled for the post of the key going all the way into the board behind so the key will go in to just the right depth and remain stable. The plate is a piece of stainless cut from leftover bits of the toaster over shell I used for my Jedi belt.

I secured the back plate temporarily with carpet tacks, and marked out the path of the key.

I left the steel rod I planned to use at my parents’ house, but fortunately I had another one lying around. It was a bit smaller, but actually not a bad size for what I needed. I flattened it into a rectangular cross section on the anvil.

A bit of filing made a serviceable notch in the bolt.

I cut a couple of brackets to hold the bolt, and tacked them in place to test them.

A couple more tacks and a piece of a hair clip made a tension spring. You can also see a piece of cardboard behind the bolt serving as a spacer, so there will be room for the hasp to go around the bolt.

The brackets are permanently secured using small pieces of copper wire as rivets.

Here is a metal spacer riveted in place behind the brackets.

While this lock would probably work, it is awfully fiddly and was not the easiest thing to fabricate. I have another method that I plan to try soon…

Mirrored from Lorenzo's Workshop.

peteyfrogboy: (rook)

Back when I was figuring out how to build locks before, I found this lovely resource that got me going in the right direction. This first version of the lock mechanism is based on what I recall doing last time, but I don’t think it’s the way I’ll be going in the end. Still, it was a good exercise.

So here we have the key I bought. In the past I cut the bit down on my keys, but this one is small enough that I plan to leave it intact. I hate to cut up old things if I don’t have to, so this makes me happy.

Here I have the back plate of the lock mechanism, with a hole drilled for the post of the key going all the way into the board behind so the key will go in to just the right depth and remain stable. The plate is a piece of stainless cut from leftover bits of the toaster over shell I used for my Jedi belt.

I secured the back plate temporarily with carpet tacks, and marked out the path of the key.

I left the steel rod I planned to use at my parents’ house, but fortunately I had another one lying around. It was a bit smaller, but actually not a bad size for what I needed. I flattened it into a rectangular cross section on the anvil.

A bit of filing made a serviceable notch in the bolt.

I cut a couple of brackets to hold the bolt, and tacked them in place to test them.

A couple more tacks and a piece of a hair clip made a tension spring. You can also see a piece of cardboard behind the bolt serving as a spacer, so there will be room for the hasp to go around the bolt.

The brackets are permanently secured using small pieces of copper wire as rivets.

Here is a metal spacer riveted in place behind the brackets.

While this lock would probably work, it is awfully fiddly and was not the easiest thing to fabricate. I have another method that I plan to try soon…

Mirrored from Lorenzo's Workshop.

peteyfrogboy: (rook)

The lock is held together with several tiny copper rivets. Here’s a little tutorial on how I made them.

I start out with a piece of copper wire clamped tightly in a pair of vise grips. There’s about 1/8″ extending above the jaws.

I set the vise grips on top of a vise that’s open just enough so that any extra wire can fit between the jaws. A piece of scrap steel with a hole drilled in it is placed over the wire so that I have a nice flat surface to work with.

The exposed end of the wire is peened to create a head for the rivet. Sometimes the wire below bends a little and needs to be straightened back out.

The rivet is cut to length with flush cutters. This is one of the points where I am most likely to lose the rivet.

If the rivet is in an easily accessible spot, I can peen the other side on the anvil. Most likely, especially when building locks, the is not the case. I use a large nail set clamped in the vise as an anvil. It allows me to support rivets in awkward places, and also gives a nice round shape to the head.

Here the rivet is placed in the hole. This is the other point where I am likely to lose it. Needlenose pliers and patience are very useful here. You can see how much stuff there is to work around on the front side of the lock; this is where the nail set comes in very handy.

And here are the rivets in place. Not the prettiest, but quite effective. When I went to replace this brass leaf spring, I had to grind the rivet out with the Dremel.

Mirrored from Lorenzo's Workshop.

peteyfrogboy: (rook)

The lock is held together with several tiny copper rivets. Here’s a little tutorial on how I made them.

I start out with a piece of copper wire clamped tightly in a pair of vise grips. There’s about 1/8″ extending above the jaws.

I set the vise grips on top of a vise that’s open just enough so that any extra wire can fit between the jaws. A piece of scrap steel with a hole drilled in it is placed over the wire so that I have a nice flat surface to work with.

The exposed end of the wire is peened to create a head for the rivet. Sometimes the wire below bends a little and needs to be straightened back out.

The rivet is cut to length with flush cutters. This is one of the points where I am most likely to lose the rivet.

If the rivet is in an easily accessible spot, I can peen the other side on the anvil. Most likely, especially when building locks, the is not the case. I use a large nail set clamped in the vise as an anvil. It allows me to support rivets in awkward places, and also gives a nice round shape to the head.

Here the rivet is placed in the hole. This is the other point where I am likely to lose it. Needlenose pliers and patience are very useful here. You can see how much stuff there is to work around on the front side of the lock; this is where the nail set comes in very handy.

And here are the rivets in place. Not the prettiest, but quite effective. When I went to replace this brass leaf spring, I had to grind the rivet out with the Dremel.

Mirrored from Lorenzo's Workshop.

Profile

peteyfrogboy: (Default)
peteyfrogboy

Most Popular Tags

Expand Cut Tags

No cut tags
Page generated Sep. 23rd, 2017 12:40 pm
Powered by Dreamwidth Studios